ayyyyyyyy

dustjacketattic:

new york townhouse | sawyer berson

dustjacketattic:

new york townhouse | sawyer berson

partytilfajr:

me 87.4% of the time on tumblr

…Good conduct is essential, and good conduct means putting up with painful things rather than trying to repel them. They say that the Arabic word for ‘journey’ is safar because it reveals (yusfiru ‘an) a person’s character. That is why ‘Umar (may Allah be pleased with him) asked someone who claimed to know a man: ‘Have you accompanied him on a journey that would show up his good qualities?’ Since the answer was no, he told him: ‘Then I don’t see how you can know him.’
Imam al-Ghazali’s ‘Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship’; chapter on the Excellence of Pilgrimage; [Fine Points of Propriety - 4. Forsaking Evil Conduct] (via qaswaa)

I’m trying to find the balance between recognizing the truth of others’ criticisms and the conviction of my own judgment.

I want to know that I’m not picking the opposite of something to prove to someone else that I’m doing the right thing.

I’m tired of anxiously twitching every time I invest my heart into something you don’t approve.

I know everyone else has a vision for my life, and if I’m making a mistake, maybe I want the chance to find out on my own.

I would hope you could cheer on my dream, no matter how silly it sounds or how you’ve made up your mind or how you think you’d do it differently. You might despise writing or dancing or music or ministry or charity or the arts — but that could be resentment for something you didn’t even try to understand.

I want a fair chance to pursue my passions without extra discouragement and distraction and division: because you are making a hard thing even harder.

You can either be the voice that fuels my self-doubt and fear, and I’ll have to overcome you, or you can be the voice that grows a deeper thoughtfulness about my own direction and creates forward momentum, and I’ll thank you later.

J.S. (via jspark3000)

partytilfajr:

Patience isn’t easy.

Patience is tears. Patience is cringing out of anxiety. Patience is wanting to smash your fists into sujud. Patience is crying for a response from God. Patience is feeling alone. Patience is painful. Patience is taxing. Patience is clenched fists and grinding teeth. Patience is swallowing insults. Patience is smiles covering tears. Patience is so hard.

But remember, The Qur’an says:

"And how could we not place our trust in God, seeing that it is He who has shown us the path which we are to follow?’ ‘Hence, we shall certainly bear with patience whatever hurt you may do us: for, all who have trust [in His existence] must place their trust in God [alone]!’" [14:12]

Remember Who gave you the path to your salvation, have trust in your Lord, and remind yourself of what The Prophet said:

"Seek closeness [to God] and be steadfast [patient], and in all that afflicts the believer there is atonement, even a thorn that pricks him, and the hardship he suffers." [Tirmidhi]

indianajosh:

A visual discourse on the aesthetics of late-90s Rhythm and Blues from a post-structural approach.

Truncated due to lack of recording space on iPad, apparently.

speciesbarocus:

Joel Bybee - Library @ Wimpole Hall, Cambridgeshire (2011).

speciesbarocus:

Joel Bybee - Library @ Wimpole Hall, Cambridgeshire (2011).

archilovers:

Clarendon Works, London, 2012 by moreno:masey architecture http://bit.ly/1qF0tXv #architecture #design

archilovers:

Clarendon Works, London, 2012 by moreno:masey architecture http://bit.ly/1qF0tXv #architecture #design

I.O.U.
Luke James

jspark3000:

Some of our engagement photos at Buddy Brew Coffee, taken by Angel He Photography.

rashadsays:

These companies will put “halal” in front of anything to increase sales bruh. TELL ME HOW THIS RICE WAS FORBIDDEN BEFORE YOU MADE IT OKAY???

azizaesque:

This illuminated manuscript contains two works by Sa‘dī (d. 691 AH / 1292 CE): the Gulistān (Rose garden) and the Būstān (Orchard). It was copied in 980 AH / 1572 CE by Muḥammad Riz̤ā al-Tabrīzī in Iran.

The text of the Gulistān appears in the main area, while that of the Būstān is inscribed obliquely around the main text area on three sides. Both texts are written in black and gold nasta‘līq script.

The margins are multi-colored, gold-sprinkled tinted or marbled paper. The original leather binding dates to the tenth century AH / sixteenth CE and has dentelle-style decorated boards and doublures with gold filigree work over a multi-colored ground of blue, green, red, and black.

These images were created and are provided through a Preservation and Access grant awarded to The Walters Art Museum by the National Endowment for the Humanities, 2008-2010.

Basically working on these till Saturday. Omg.

©